Thursday June 1, 2017

DANCE AWAY YOUR SHOULDER PAIN

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by Doctor of Physical Therapy Troy Vander Molen

o-HAPPY-facebookShoulder pain is a common problem. People with shoulder pain are the third most common clients we serve at our clinics. In fact, over the past three years, we’ve had nearly 10,000 treatment sessions dedicated to shoulder issues. That’s a lot of shoulder pain!

The shoulder is prone to issues because it is an extremely mobile ball-and-socket joint. The mechanics of the shoulder are complex, though we seem to take that for granted until we begin to experience pain.

To understand the shoulder, we must first realize that the shoulder joint is really a shoulder complex made up of four different connection points or joints (Figure 1). Because the scapulothoracic joint connects to the spine and rib cage through muscles, the only bone-to-bone connection between the shoulder complex and the trunk is through the sternoclavicular joint where the collar bone connects to the breast bone.

Shoulder pain
Figure 1: The Shoulder Complex

Most shoulder problems occur beneath the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in an area known as the subacromial space. Through that space travel important rotator cuff tendons and a bursa, which provides cushion in an area prone to pinching forces.

Imagine what happens to that limited space when you raise your arm. As the upper arm elevates, the subacromial space can experience compressive forces that add pressure to those tissues. And unfortunately those tissues are prone to irritation because they are not well-endowed with the important flow of blood that provides nutrition to the tissues and removes waste.

When those tissues experience too much physical stress, we experience “itis” issues like tendinitis and bursitis.

If the shoulder functions well, however, the pressure does not build and inflammation isn’t experienced. That’s because the upper arm and the remainder of the shoulder complex is designed to “dance.” In other words, when the upper arm bone moves, the rest of the shoulder is supposed to move with it. This dance results in a relatively consistent amount of space within the subacromial region, and pinching forces are almost non-existent.

The dance doesn’t always occur as designed, and like most musculoskeletal problems, the thing that hurts – in this case, the tissues within the subacromial space – suffers because a close neighbor isn’t taking care of some of its responsibilities.

One of the primary culprits for shoulder pain and a major reason the dance is interrupted is poor shoulder blade movement. Like nearly all bones, the shoulder blade is made to experience three-dimensional movement – up and down, side-to-side, and rotation.

When we raise our arm from our side to overhead, which is 180 degrees of movement, the upper arm contributes approximately 120 degrees of that movement. The rest of the movement comes from elevation and rotation of the shoulder blade on the rib cage.

We have found that in many people the shoulder blade is locked down and doesn’t move as it is designed. Therefore, when the individual raises her arm, her shoulder blade motion stops while the upper arm movement continues. Have you ever accidentally stepped on a dance partner’s toe? That’s what happens at the shoulder, and if that happens too often, your partner is going to have an inflamed toe.

troySo, if you’re currently dealing with shoulder pain or have experienced it in the past, you could eliminate the real problem and achieve real progress by making sure the shoulder blade is dancing in sync with the upper arm. We’d love for you to join us for a free shoulder screen.

We’d love to give you 20 minutes of our time to figure out if this dance is the reason for your pain. Unfortunately, we don’t have enough time for all of you. We did, however, save 10 slots in our schedule. Call 866-588-0230 now or email us to claim one before they are all taken up.

Thursday June 1, 2017

A HOME FOR LUCY THE ROBIN

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by Rachel Johnson, Athletic trainer for Kinetic Edge Physical Therapy in Ames

Kendall with nestMy youngest daughter, Kendall, just turned five and has been into crafts lately. This new affinity has turned her into a pack rat collecting stickers to belly button lint and everything in between. So, I shouldn’t have been surprised when Kendall collected an armful of sticks while on a walk with my dad. However, I was less than thrilled with my dad when Kendall insisted that we take them home.

Kendall said she had a “vision” of making a bird nest for Lucy and Ricky, the neighborhood robins named by their grandma after I Love Lucy characters. One evening in March, my husband and Kendall went to work on her vision. Since the sticks were cold and dry, our kitchen floor quickly became peppered with brittle, broken sticks. My husband was getting frustrated that the sticks couldn’t be curved into a nest shape and wanted to give up.

That’s when Kendall had the idea to soak the sticks in water to help them bend, and it worked! Once the sticks could be bent, they wove them into the frame and used hot glue to hold them together. Kendall also collected mud, leaves, and grass from our yard to fill the holes on the inside of the nest. Once everything dried, we took her nest outside and placed it in our front tree.

Building a robin's nestWeeks went by and nothing happened with the nest. We went out of town for Easter and returned home to find the nest had been renovated. Something had added grass clippings! This all got Kendall very excited about a bird moving into her nest.

Worms 1That’s when she came up with her next idea: birds eat worms. Logically, the next step at our five-star bird hotel was to provide worms. We dug in the garden, filled a plate full of worms, and placed it at the foot of the tree. We even put a few in the nest to seal the deal. What bird wouldn’t enjoy room service, right?

We spent the next several days watching out the window as the birds enjoyed the worms and hopped around in the trees. Finally, it happened. We came home from school and saw Lucy in the nest. As we approached the nest, she flew away revealing she had laid an egg! Our whole family was elated!

Nest in treeOur research said that robins typically lay one egg a day for four days, meaning a total of four eggs. Unfortunately, I believe a combination of our excitement over the first egg combined with a week of cold weather yielded few subsequent visits from Lucy the robin. We’re still hoping that she returns to try our nest again, this time as we observe from afar.

As a mom, it was fun watching Kendall take her vision, develop it, and create something useful. She took it way farther than anyone expected her to, and even if the robin doesn’t come back, it got her excited about being creative, learning about nature, and most importantly, not giving up on an idea. I’m sure she’ll try again next year, but I hesitate to see what she does with that belly button lint.

Tuesday May 30, 2017

GET TO SLEEP & STAY ASLEEP

Sleep seminar

Sleep seminar

Free sleep seminar

Did you know that 69% of American infants, children, and teens are sleep deprived? Proper sleep is crucial for being awake and alert, and just 41 minutes of sleep deprivation decreases the ability to pay attention and be alert.

Join Occupational Therapist Elise Spronk on June 20 for this free sleep seminar to learn the keys to falling asleep and staying asleep. Discover things that innocently disrupt and set the body clock, as well as how sensory preferences and choices can assist in calming and promoting good sleep for you and your loved ones.

There is no cost to attend this event, but seating is limited. Reserve your spot today by calling Kinetic Edge at 641-621-0230 or email us.

*This workshop qualifies for foster care continued education credits.

eliseElise Spronk is an occupational therapist who specializes in pediatrics and hand therapy. Her mission at Kinetic Edge is to provide hope and help to her clients through therapy sessions that are meaningful and fun (especially for the kids). Elise earned her master’s degree in occupational therapy from the University of South Dakota.

Wednesday May 24, 2017

MEET WHITNEY STEINGARD

Whitney Steingard

New Pediatric Physical Therapist in Pella and Oskaloosa

Whitney SteingardKinetic Edge Physical Therapy is proud to announce the addition of Whitney Steingard, as their newest physical therapist in Oskaloosa and Pella.

Whitney’s mission is to help each of her patients achieve their personal goals through optimization of movement in a positive, educational, and fun environment. She has a passion pediatric physical therapy and spent the past year working in an outpatient pediatric setting in Omaha.

Whitney earned her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Athletic Training from Bethel College in North Newton, Kansas.

Whitney lives in Oskaloosa and is getting married to Mike Vander Veen in November of 2017.  In her free time, she enjoys playing volleyball, biking, watching movies, and taking naps.

Whitney is excited to restore health, happiness, and hope. Schedule an appointment or contact her by calling 866-588-0230.

About Kinetic Edge Physical Therapy

Kinetic Edge Physical Therapy’s mission is to transform lives and restore hope through movement. They envision communities of healthy, happy, and hope-filled people and work towards that through the services they provide. Kinetic Edge has clinics in Pella, Des Moines, Oskaloosa, Newton, and Ames and consults throughout the state of Iowa and beyond. Their services include physical therapy, occupational therapy, worker performance, athletic training, pediatric therapy, and medical fitness.

Tuesday May 9, 2017

MEET KAITY HALL: NEW DES MOINES PHYSICAL THERAPIST

Des_Moines_Physical_Therapist

Des_Moines_Physical_TherapistKinetic Edge Physical Therapy is proud to announce the addition of Kaity Hall, as their newest Des Moines Physical Therapist who is now accepting new patients.

Kaity’s mission is to serve clients by looking at them as a whole and providing functional treatments, in addition to promoting overall health and wellness. She has a passion for functional treatment and regularly uses a Gary Gray functional movement analysis and treatment approach.

Kaity earned her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Des Moines University. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Athletic Training from UNI.

Kaity and her husband, Austin, reside in Urbandale. In her free time, she enjoys being outdoors, going to the Farmer’s Market, cooking, and exercising.

Kaity is excited to restore health, happiness, and hope. Schedule an appointment or contact her by calling 515-309-4706.

About Kinetic Edge Physical Therapy

Kinetic Edge Physical Therapy’s mission is to transform lives and restore hope through movement. They envision communities of healthy, happy, and hope-filled people and work towards that through the services they provide. Kinetic Edge has clinics in Pella, Des Moines, Oskaloosa, Newton, and Ames and consults throughout the state of Iowa and beyond. Their services include physical therapy, occupational therapy, worker performance, athletic training, pediatric therapy, and medical fitness.

 

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